Our Friend, Mentor, and Relative Roy H. Sampsel Walks On

Roy Sampsel

On November 13, 2017 Mr. Sampsel passed away at his home in Ocean Shores, Washington.  Roy worked for over five decades with Tribes, First Nations, Alaska Native communities, and many federal and state government representative in the fish and wildlife, environmental, water resources, cultural, economic development, and intergovernmental sectors.  He worked tirelessly to build capacity, advocate and protect important policies, and leverage much needed resources to tribal communities across Indian Country, most prominently in the Pacific Northwest, Columbia River Basin and the Yukon River Watershed.

 

Many who work in the tribal, environmental, water resources, and intergovernmental arenas, knew “Roy” on a first-name basis and considered him a dear friend. They know how most working relationships with Roy began with a phone call followed up by either a breakfast or lunch meeting –or in many cases, a series of breakfast or lunch meetings — where Roy would impart upon his guest his vast expertise of history, issues, dates, times, and people.  In addition to feeling more knowledgeable at the end of these sessions, many of us were also able to better map our own pathways forward – be it on behalf of a personal goal, a policy outcome, a resource initiative, or an event.  In the wake of his networking, ideas were catapulted into action, invaluable partnerships were forged, and connections among people to resources were formed or reaffirmed.

 

Roy’s contributions to Indian Country, and the Pacific Northwest were vast.  He served in a wide range of leadership positions –as a political appointee, as an academic, as a policy advisor, and perhaps most important of all, as a mentor.  Roy was professional, courteous, and highly respected, endearing  himself to countless people in many ways. The work he accomplished in more than five decades of tribal relations is remarkable and can always be tied back to his positive attitude and respect for so many people.

 

Here are some of Roy’s many professional accomplishments, a few in a long list of work in Indian Country.

  • 1971-1976, Special Assistant to the Secretary of Interior for the Pacific Northwest Region
  • 1977-1979, first Executive Director, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission
  • 1981 – 1983, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs
  • 1983 – 2003, founding Board Member for the Institute of Tribal Government
  • 2003 – 2014, Executive Director, Institute of Tribal Government and the Tribal Leadership Forum
  • 1990s-2000s, He advised on Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority’s “Integrated System Plan” for salmon recovery, that led to the Pacific Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s (Council) “Sub-basin Plans” for recovery which in turn influenced National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s strategy for locally produced recovery plans;
  • In the last 1990’s, Roy facilitated the Power Council’s “Multi-species Framework;”
  • 2000-2008, Roy worked behind the scenes to help bring about the 2008 Fish Accord agreements between three lower river tribes and the federal agencies.
  • 2014, Ecotrust Indigenous Leadership Awardee Winner
  • 2014-2017, President, Institute of Tribal Government Policy Board

Roy’s work and leadership at PSU’s Institute for Tribal Government touched the lives of many elected and appointed tribal leaders across the country, along with many federal and state elected and appointed leaders.  The Institute of Tribal Government, which he headed for nearly a decade, has served as a resource for promoting and building tribal governance capacity, and has operated since 2001 as a self-sustaining unit within PSU’s Mark O. Hatfield School of Government and the Center for Public Service. Under Roy’s leadership the Institute for Tribal Government served as a program incubator to the tribal climate change summit, tribal first foods work, tribal energy and economic development, and most recently the first intertribal water summit. In 2016, Roy’s leadership was a catalyst in helping launch the Institute’s Certificate in Tribal Relations.

 

In the decades of Roy’s work, he rarely stopped to look back at the wake of his endeavors; he was, perhaps more than anything else, a forward-looking man.  Roy busied himself daily with keeping people connected, ideas flowing, keeping tasks on track, and projects moving toward completion.  Roy was the man that helped so many of his colleagues keep our eyes on the prize, and helped us maintain strategic direction in our efforts. Roy touched so many lives, especially those of us tribal, First Nations, and Alaskan Natives who have taken on energy, fish and wildlife, environmental, water resources, and intergovernmental affairs as our careers.

 

We will miss him, especially his phone calls checking in on us, greeting us with a robust and warm “Hello my friend! Things in your world, I trust, are going great?”  May Roy have a blessed journey.

 

Donations in lieu of flowers can be made by clicking the donate button below or by mail to the PSU Foundation, P.O.Box 243, Portland Oregon 97207-0243.

 

Direlle Calica, Director, PSU’s Institute for Tribal Government

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EMPA 2010 Cohort Visits Hanoi, Vietnam

Our Executive Master of Public Administration (EMPA) 2010 cohort is visiting Hanoi, Vietnam November 5-13. The members are preparing for an amazing experience focusing on political leadership challenges unique to Vietnam.

The weeklong program is incredibly eye opening as students explore the challenges and opportunities facing public administration and government organizations. These sessions quickly turn into dialogues for collaboration as the peers bond over shared experiences.

While in Hanoi, the CPS faculty utilize the EMERGE curriculum to present case studies on leadership development and public administration in Vietnam’s urban areas. This allows the students to gain a global viewpoint on public service and new perspectives on issues in their home communities.

Previous International Field Experiences have included visits to Lanzhou, China and Seoul, Korea.

EMPA is designed for forward-looking public and nonprofit professionals who have more than10 years experience successfully managing people, programs and organizational units, and our now ready to assume a role of advanced leadership.

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Sustainable Tribal Forestry Seminar

Institute for Tribal GovernanceThis summer, CPS is happy to be working with the Institute for Tribal Government (ITG) and Ecotrust to present a seminar on Sustainable Tribal Forestry. This partnership strengthens PSU’s commitment to sustainable development and community leadership. The ITG strives (among other goals) to provide tribal leaders with the tools necessary to effectively manage their natural resources. The upcoming Sustainable Tribal Forestry Seminar (August 8-11) will be conducted with this ambition in mind. Main themes of the seminar will include: how to utilize forest carbon credits, new market tax credits, forest stewardship council certification, and holistic watershed restoration strategies. Tribal leaders and staff are invited to register now. Continue reading

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New Energy Economy Summer Series

Wind turbineIn response to the needs and desires of local public agencies and energy organizations, CPS Adjunct Assistant Professor Jeff Hammarlund is coordinating with other faculty and industry experts to offer a series of two- and three-day workshops over the summer focused on what we are calling the “New Energy Economy.” Workshops will focus on using a systems approach to analyzing and understanding the complexities of the electric energy system; new and evolving business models for the energy industry; climate change and its effect on business as well as policy; project and program management for energy efficiency professionals; and the smart grid and sustainable energy systems.

Details and Registration Information

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New at CPS: Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit and Public Management

The Institute for Nonprofit Management and Center for Public Service at Portland State University are pleased to announce a new Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit and Public Management. Currently known as the Graduate Certificate in Public Management, the expanded program represents a new initiative joining our robust collection of nonprofit programs with the public management offerings at the Center for Public Service. This summer we are recruiting our first cohort of students with an emphasis on nonprofit management. Applications are due July 31.  Continue reading

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Letter from the Director – Summer 2011

Photo of Phil Keisling, Director, Center for Public Service

Phil Keisling, Director, Center for Public Service

In these challenging times, certain phrases seem increasingly common in discussions about the public sector — e.g, “outcomes-based budgeting”; “performance measurement,” “lean management” and “government transformation.”

But how well do public administration scholars and practitioners understand some of the subtle but often powerful differences between such core concepts as “management” and “leadership”; “outputs” and “outcomes”; and program “efficiency” and “effectiveness”? What insights can the latest academic research provide to practitioners wrestling with these concepts on a regular basis? And in return, how can and should the work and experience of practitioners best inform future scholarship and inquiry?

These and related questions will be center stage this October 1-2 as Portland State University and our Center for Public Service plays host to the Second International Conference on Government Performance Management and Leadership. And I’d like to personally invite elected officials and leaders in local, state, federal, and tribal governments throughout the Northwest to be part of this important gathering.

Through generous donations from the community, we’re able to offer a reduced registration rate for those interested in observing the conference presentations and having a chance to learn from – and compare notes with – more than 120 scholars and practitioners from around the world. Conference co-sponsors include China’s Lanzhou University; Japan’s Waseda University; Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh Academy of National Politics and Public Administration; and Rutgers University and its Public Performance Measurement and Reporting Network.

The theme of this year’s conference – “Innovations Toward Sustainable Solutions” – is also especially timely and relevant. We’re also viewing the conference as another key milestone in the Center for Public Service’s evolving mission to better connect scholars and students with the needs of real world practitioners.

Your participation will help inform that important work – and hopefully will give you new ideas and perspectives on how these challenges aren’t just unique to our communities. I hope you will be able to join us.

More details about the conference and how to register can be found at http://www.lanzhou-hatfield.pdx.edu/2011-conference.

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International Spotlight: Japan

2009 cohort engaging in group discussion, facilitated by Professor Nishishiba

2009 cohort engaging in group discussion, facilitated by Professor Nishishiba

The Tokyo Foundation and the Center for Public Service at PSU’s Hatfield School of Government have jointly developed a specialized professional development training program for Japanese municipal government managers. This program is designed to prepare local government managers in Japan for the increased responsibility placed upon them as a result of a major initiative to decentralize governing responsibility in Japan. Since 2004, a talented group of municipal managers from around Japan are appointed by their mayor to partake in this educational experience.

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